Spotlight Scotland – The Fife Pilgrim Way

There’s the well known West Highland Way. Or the Speyside Way following the iconic river. Or the not-to-be-taken lightly Southern Upland Way. These are just a few of Scotland’s long-distance walking trails. All three are serious undertakings taking you through some of the country’s most rugged countryside.

A hike on Fife’s camino – Culross to St Andrews

Ah, peace at last. I’m lost in a riot of wildflowers somewhere near Glenrothes, and there comes a moment when I’ve never been so close to home and yet so far away. Rabbits bound ahead of me. Dragonflies and damselflies hover. Frogs leap in puddles.

Ah, peace at last. I’m lost in a riot of wildflowers somewhere near Glenrothes, and there comes a moment when I’ve never been so close to home and yet so far away. Rabbits bound ahead of me. Dragonflies and damselflies hover. Frogs leap in puddles.

If you are looking for something a little less taxing but still takes you through beautiful Scottish countryside then The Fife Pilgrim Way could be ideal. Not only does it offer the walker a low-level, multi-day, option it walks you through some fascinating Scottish history. The walk starts in the charming conservation village of Culross, recognisable to Outlander fans as the stand-in for Cranesmuir in the TV series.

Historic Dunfermline and its abbey – burial place of Scottish Kings and Queens – provides an insight to the grandeur of the royal court. The town also is proud of its connection with industrialist and entrepreneur Andrew Carnegie who was born there.

Journey’s end, as it was for thousands of pilgrims before, is the university town of St Andrews. In medieval times the town’s big draw was the cathedral and the holy relics of Scotland’s patron saint. Today, young people flock here to study at one of Europe’s oldest academic institutions.